Bee Ridge Snake Trapping and Removal [News Blog]

Police warn of Cottonmouth snakes in Coral Springs dog park

 By Jeff Tavss – Executive Producer

CORAL SPRINGS, Fla. – Police are warning residents of reports of cottonmouth snakes found inside a Coral Springs dog park.

The Coral Springs police department used Twitter to issue the warning Wednesday of snakes at the Sportsplex located at 2575 Sportsplex Drive.

Residents are urged to avoid the snakes if found inside the park, and call police at 954-344-1800.

Cottonmouth snakes are venomous and capable of delivering a fatal bite.

The Dr. Steven G. Paul Dog Park is open from dawn to 9:30 p.m.

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THE FOUR NATIVE VENOMOUS SNAKES OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

Snake Trapping and Removal Lakewood Ranch [News Blog] 5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing up in Toilets

Keeping Pets Safe from Snakes

 

Read more Bee Ridge Snake Trapping and Removal [News Blog]

Miramar Residents Concerned – Numerous Venomous Snakes [News Blog] Trapping & Removal Bee Ridge

Andre Perez – Reporter Local 10

MIRAMAR, Fla. – Residents are concerned after a number of venomous water moccasins, or cottonmouths, have been spotted in communities in western Broward County in recent weeks.

Miramar resident Eric Misch spotted a snake hiding under a rock in his front yard not long ago. Shortly after he killed it, his neighbor reported finding another one outside her home.

 

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Read more Miramar Residents Concerned – Numerous Venomous Snakes [News Blog] Trapping & Removal Bee Ridge

Snake Trapping and Removal Lakewood Ranch [News Blog] 5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing up in People’s Toilets

by Reegan Von Wildenradt Jan 5, 2018

 

​5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing Up in People's Toilets

YOUTUBE.COM / FACEBOOK.COM
If you’re reading this while seated on a toilet, we advise you to finish up before proceeding. We hate to break it to you, but snakes crawling up toilets is a real-life thing that happens outside of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Read more Snake Trapping and Removal Lakewood Ranch [News Blog] 5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing up in People’s Toilets

Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ [News Blog]

Story Credit: Mirror  By: Luke Kenton

Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ after allowing ‘world’s deadliest snakes’ to bite him HUNDREDS of times

Tim Friede has inflicted himself with more than 200 bites from snakes that could kill within minutes in bid to help develop life-saving vaccines.

A scientist claims he’s ‘immune to venom’ after allowing himself to be bitten by the world’s deadliest snakes hundreds of times.

Tim Friede has inflicted himself with more than 200 bites from snakes that could kill within minutes in a bid to help develop life-saving vaccines.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

Read more Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ [News Blog]

Snakes Alive! 31 pound Burmese python devours 35 pound white-tailed deer fawn in Florida. – News Blog

NAPLES, Fla. — Patrick Riley, Naples, FL Daily636555228362449747-1---Burmese-python-captured-in-Southwest-Florida-with-large-prey-item-.JPG

For Burmese pythons — one of South Florida’s most notorious invasive species — few meals are too big. But new research by scientists suggests the snake might be snacking above its weight class.

While tracking pythons in Collier Seminole State Park in Collier County, a group of wildlife biologists from the Conservancy of Southwest Florida and land managers from the state park stumbled upon an unsettling discovery: An 11-foot Burmese python that had devoured a white-tailed deer fawn weighing more than the snake.

The 2015 finding, which has since been peer-reviewed and is set to be published in the Herpetological Review this month, is believed to be the largest python-to-prey ratio documented to date, with the snake weighing 31.5 pounds and the deer 35 pounds, said Ian Bartoszek, wildlife biologist and science coordinator for the Conservancy.

“It almost did not compute,” he said during an announcement of the findings in the Conservancy’s snake laboratory Thursday.

More: Man crosses paths with two pythons on way to pick up takeout

More: Python hunt fuels fashion for Fla. business

“We were sitting there just trying to process that an animal this size could get its head around what turned out to be a deer. It’s surreal to see that in the field.”

When the researchers moved the snake out of the wild into an open area that day, the stressed python began to regurgitate the deer, Bartoszek said.

But had the snake’s meal been uninterrupted, the python would have eventually fully digested the fawn, which was less than 6 months old, he said. The python was later humanely euthanized.

Burmese pythons, which came to South Florida via the pet trade beginning in the late 1970s and were eventually accidentally or intentionally released into the wild, have had the delicate local ecosystem in a chokehold for years.

But the Conservancy’s recent discovery could spell more bad news for Florida’s already endangered panther population, Bartoszek said.

“White-tailed deer are the primary prey for our state and federally protected Florida panther,” he said. “That’s panther food.”

TO READ OUR POST ON THE 4 NON – NATIVE VENOMOUS SNAKES THAT LIVE IN  FLORIDA CLICK HERE 

snake-removal-siesta-key-FL
Rainbow Boa Constrictor

With Burmese pythons capable of reaching near 20 feet in length, finding a relatively small specimen successfully devouring a fawn heavier than the snake was “jaw-dropping,” Bartoszek said.

“It showed my team and myself what we were actually dealing with out tFrom left, Kathy Worley, director of science, Ian Easterling,here, what this python is capable of,” he said.

To be sure, Bartoszek said, the pythons, which are apex predators, have been known to swallow large animals, including alligators. What stunned the scientists was the predator-to-prey ratio, he said.

“We know that they’ll take adult deer now and then,” Bartoszek said. “If they’re tapping into young deer, then that just makes me a little bit worried that there will be additional impacts that we haven’t even considered yet.”

 

 

During a news conference on Thursday, March 1, 2018,

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials don’t keep records of python predator-to-prey ratios, said Carli Segelson, a spokeswoman for the agency’s division of habitat and species conservation.

“Pythons pose a concern for all native wildlife in Florida,” she wrote in an email. “Although infrequent, pythons are known to occasionally take a fawn or small deer, and this has been well documented previously. However, pythons are not believed to be a significant predator of deer.”

 The Conservancy’s python program, which launched about five years ago and is funded by private donors and the Naples Zoo, has researchers radio-tag pythons and then follow them to other snakes during breeding season to remove them from the wild.

As of last month, the Conservancy’s team has removed hundreds of adult Burmese pythons with a combined weight of more than 10,000 pounds in Southwest Florida.

Parallel to the Conservancy’s efforts, the South Florida Water Management District launched a python elimination program last year, sending python hunters into district-owned lands in Miami-Dade, Broward and Collier counties to track down the snakes and remove them.

 

SNAKE REMOVAL EXPERTS: Available 24/7

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Read more: http://www.lowellsun.com/opinion/ci_31652011/snakes-plane-emotional-support#ixzz56YvYuSUv

WORRIED ABOUT SNAKES? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

 Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. is very well known in the community as the GO-TO expert with the highest experience level in solving difficult insect and pest infestations efficiently and easily. We employ advanced technology such as thermographic cameras and Go-pro technology. This reduces the amount of damage to your structure and this will reduce the overall cost of your project.  

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103

 

Read more Snakes Alive! 31 pound Burmese python devours 35 pound white-tailed deer fawn in Florida. – News Blog

How Can You Tell if a Snake is Poisonous or Not? [Lakewood Ranch, FL]

 

It is a common myth to say poisonous when it comes to snakes. However as explained in the above graphic– snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous. So to answer the question, how to tell if a snake is poisonous or not, we will have to re-state the question. How do you tell if a snake is venomous or not?

A snake that has heat-sensing pits is venomous.  What are heat sensing pits? They are holes in the snakes’ faces that are called pit organs. These organs have a membrane that has heat sensitive receptors that can detect infrared radiation from warm bodies up to one meter away. (Just over 3′) As a result, these snakes can detect prey even in the dark. They are known the venomous snakes known as “PIT VIPERS.”

Triangular heads is another common trait in many venomous snakes. For example, the rattlesnake, copperhead, and water moccasin all have arrowhead-shaped faces. Also, if you are close enough to see—- PIT VIPERS also have pupils that are oblong, like a slit.

Have questions about snakes or other wild animals on your property? Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc. is your expert for snake removal in Manatee and Sarasota County.

Call today to talk with a trusted professional. For more information or a  FREE estimate:

Call 1-866-263-WILD or 941-729-2103.

There is one native snake in Florida that is venomous yet does not fit the above description because it is not a Viper. That is the CORAL snake. It is not a PIT VIPER as are the above, but rather is from a family of snakes called the ELAPIDS. For further info on the CORAL SNAKE please read this article. 

 

WORRIED ABOUT SNAKES? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

 Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc. is fully licensed and insured. We are a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the REAL experts with the LONG-TERM experience that can save you from costly mistakes. Don’t trust your home or budget to a new guy on the block. Call today and speak with a trusted professional.

Learn more about our company here.

Snake had receded into a dark area in the walls of the home. The Go-Pro camera technology was used to secure its location and capture the snake for removal.

 

To see our summary page of the snakes and the images click here.

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103


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Venomous-Snakes-West-Central-Florida

What is the Most Venomous Snake in the United States? [Parrish, FL]

Have you ever wondered, what is the most venomous snake in the US? Well, the most fatal venomous bites are attributed to the eastern and western diamondback rattlesnake. Copperheads account for more cases of venomous snake bite than any other North American species; however, their venom is the least toxic, so their bite is not often fatal.

Snake Species

In the USA there are about 20 species of snakes that are venomous. Among those are 16 species of rattlesnakes, two species of coral snakes, one cottomouth (water moccasin) and one species of copperhead.  The only states that do NOT have a venomous snake are Alaska and Hawaii.

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) kills the most people in the US, with the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) ranking second. However, some authorities think the western diamondback is responsible for the most deaths.

 

Most Fatal Venomous Snake in USA
Most Fatal Venomous Snake in USA

 

Eastern Diamondback Among the Most Venomous Snakes in the USA Photo: Wiki

WORRIED ABOUT SNAKES? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

 Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc. is fully licensed and insured. We are a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the REAL experts with the LONG-TERM experience that can save you from costly mistakes. Don’t trust your home or budget to a new guy on the block. Call today and speak with a trusted professional.

 

Venomous-Snakes-West-Central-Florida

Click the above link to open the pdf (portable document format) file, which is the best quality for print.

Have questions about snakes or other wild animals on your property? Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. is your expert for  snake removal in Manatee County. Call today to talk with a professional wildlife technician. For more information and a FREE estimate call 1-866-263-WILD or 941-729-2103.

Learn more about our company here.

Snake had receded into a dark area in the walls of the home. The Go-Pro camera technology was used to secure its location and capture the snake for removal.

Central Florida’s Four Venomous Snake Species [Native]

There are four venomous snakes that flourish in central and southern Florida, namely the eastern diamondback, the eastern coral snake, the dusky pygmy rattlesnake and the Florida cottonmouth, also known as the water moccasin.

 Florida offers ideal weather conditions and habitat for dozens of snake species, but only four of those snake species are classified as venomous. Venomous snakes inject venom when they bite. Although venomous snakes are often described as poisonous, venomous snakes aren’t actually poisonous since poison must be ingested rather than injected. Technically, there’s no such thing as a poisonous snake. Venomous snakes, on the other hand, are dangerous and should be avoided.

Florida residents shouldn’t be overly concerned about non-venomous snakes, but it’s important to note that it can be difficult to distinguish between the previously mentioned venomous snakes and certain non-venomous snake species. It should also be mentioned that north Florida is home to the timber rattlesnake and the copperhead.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake species in the United States. The average length of an eastern diamondback is between five and six feet. This dangerous venomous snake will strike from a classic coiled position and can extend half of its body length to reach a target. Never go near an eastern diamondback to avoid serious injury.

Eastern Coral Snake

The eastern coral snake is distinguished by a red and yellow coloration pattern. The venom of the eastern coral snake is neurotoxic, affecting the nervous system and causing paralysis of the diaphragm.

Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake

The dusky pygmy rattlesnake is a small rattlesnake with an average length of between 15 and 22 inches. The rattle is so small it sounds like a buzzing insect. This venomous snake is gray with colored blotches running along its back. The venom of the dusky pygmy rattlesnake is painful but not lethal. This particular snake accounts for more Florida snakebites than any other venomous snake species.

Florida Cottonmouth

Also known as a water moccasin, the Florida cottonmouth is a venomous water snake. This dangerous venomous snake is characterized by its solid dull black or patterned coloration. The most common way to identify a water moccasin is to watch for the black eye line running from the side of the snake’s eye and down the side of its head. Even baby cottonmouths have this distinctive eye line.

To see our summary page of the snakes and the images click here.

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103


The Four Native Venomous Snakes of West Central Florida – Printable

Venomous-Snakes-West-Central-Florida

Click the above link to open the pdf (portable document format) file, which is the best quality for print.

West Central Florida’s Four Venomous Snake Species [Native]

There are four venomous snakes that flourish in central and southern Florida, namely the eastern diamondback, the eastern coral snake, the dusky pygmy rattlesnake and the Florida cottonmouth, also known as the water moccasin.

 Florida offers ideal weather conditions and habitat for dozens of snake species, but only four of those snake species are classified as venomous. Venomous snakes inject venom when they bite. Although venomous snakes are often described as poisonous, venomous snakes aren’t actually poisonous since poison must be ingested rather than injected. Technically, there’s no such thing as a poisonous snake. Venomous snakes, on the other hand, are dangerous and should be avoided.

Florida residents shouldn’t be overly concerned about non-venomous snakes, but it’s important to note that it can be difficult to distinguish between the previously mentioned venomous snakes and certain non-venomous snake species. It should also be mentioned that north Florida is home to the timber rattlesnake and the copperhead.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake species in the United States. The average length of an eastern diamondback is between five and six feet. This dangerous venomous snake will strike from a classic coiled position and can extend half of its body length to reach a target. Never go near an eastern diamondback to avoid serious injury.

Eastern Coral Snake

The eastern coral snake is distinguished by a red and yellow coloration pattern. The venom of the eastern coral snake is neurotoxic, affecting the nervous system and causing paralysis of the diaphragm.

Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake

The dusky pygmy rattlesnake is a small rattlesnake with an average length of between 15 and 22 inches. The rattle is so small it sounds like a buzzing insect. This venomous snake is gray with colored blotches running along its back. The venom of the dusky pygmy rattlesnake is painful but not lethal. This particular snake accounts for more Florida snakebites than any other venomous snake species.

Florida Cottonmouth

Also known as a water moccasin, the Florida cottonmouth is a venomous water snake. This dangerous venomous snake is characterized by its solid dull black or patterned coloration. The most common way to identify a water moccasin is to watch for the black eye line running from the side of the snake’s eye and down the side of its head. Even baby cottonmouths have this distinctive eye line.

To see our summary page of the snakes and the images click here.

Snake Trapped in a Beer Can [News Blog]

 

Stewart Gannt – News for Kids

A TIGER snake with a taste for Australian beer found itself trapped while trying to drink from a can this week.

The venomous* reptile slithered into the can in Wyndham Vale in Melbourne’s western suburbs and became stuck.

Stewart Gatt — aka Stewy the Snake Catcher — said its head was trapped.

 

Stewart Gatt, the snake catcher, frees the tiger snake from a beer can. Supplied image
Stewart Gatt, the snake catcher, frees the tiger snake from a beer can. Supplied image

 

The residents who found the snake in trouble tried to free it themselves. Not a wise move as getting the snake free was not easy — even for a professional.

“It was awkward*,” Mr Gatt said.

“The snake was in enough it was stuck in the can. If you cut the wrong spot you could hurt the snake. It is a very delicate* situation.”

Mr Gatt tried to reassure the snake that he was there to save it, not that it helped.

“Yeah mate, I know you are in pain. Just relax for a minute,” he said in the video.

“Stop struggling for a minute. Relax mate, I am saving you.”

The residents who found the snake in trouble tried to free it themselves. Not a wise move as getting the snake free was not easy — even for a professional.

“It was awkward*,” Mr Gatt said.

“The snake was in enough it was stuck in the can. If you cut the wrong spot you could hurt the snake. It is a very delicate* situation.”

Mr Gatt tried to reassure the snake that he was there to save it, not that it helped.

“Yeah mate, I know you are in pain. Just relax for a minute,” he said in the video.

“Stop struggling for a minute. Relax mate, I am saving you.”

TO READ OUR POST ON THE 4 NON – NATIVE VENOMOUS SNAKES THAT LIVE IN  FLORIDA CLICK HERE 

SNAKE REMOVAL EXPERTS: Available 24/7

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The snake with its head stuck deep inside the can. Supplied imageThe tiger snake tied to bite the can. Supplied image

 

WORRIED ABOUT SNAKES? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

As Mr Gatt cut a hole in the can, the snake popped its head through and tried to bite the can.

“Snakes are deaf so I have no idea why I was doing it. I was talking myself through it really,” Mr Gatt said.

“I do not know what the fascination* with snakes and cans is. He was thirsty and probably wanted a dark spot and once he sticks his head in, he cannot stick his head out again.”

Mr Gatt has been caring for the tiger snake since the rescue and is expected to release the animal this week.

“We are going to make sure there are no ongoing injuries,” he said.

Tiger snakes are highly venomous, quick to bite when cornered and very common around most of Victoria, much of New South Wales, far southeast Queensland, Tasmania, southeast South Australia and southwest Western Australia.

 

 Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. is very well known in the community as the GO-TO expert with the highest experience level in solving difficult insect and pest infestations efficiently and easily. We employ advanced technology such as thermographic cameras and Go-pro technology. This reduces the amount of damage to your structure and this will reduce the overall cost of your project.  

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103

 

Read more Snake Trapped in a Beer Can [News Blog]

Reptile Rescuer Accused of Abandoning Snakes, Spiders at Warehouse [News Blog]

Steve Breinholt, Deseret News
Dozens of venomous snakes, poisonous spiders, alligators, turtles and other creatures are pictured at a warehouse at 641 W. 6960 South in Midvale on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. In a phone interview from his hospital bed at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray on Wednesday, James Dix, owner of Utah’s Reptile Rescue Service, said he had a heart attack and that is why he hasn’t been able to care for dozens of venomous snakes, poisonous spiders, alligators, turtles and other creatures at he left at the warehouse.

Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. is your expert for snake removal in Sarasota County.

Call today to talk with a professional wildlife technician.

For more information or a FREE estimate call 1-866-263-WILD or 941-729-2103.

 

MIDVALE — A well-known reptile rescuer is under investigation, accused of abandoning dozens of venomous snakes, poisonous spiders, alligators, turtles and other creatures at a Midvale warehouse for two weeks.

James Dix, owner of Utah’s Reptile Rescue Service, denies abandoning the animals at the warehouse at 641 W. 6960 South. In a phone interview from his hospital bed at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Dix said he had a heart attack and that is why he hasn’t been able to care for the animals. He is currently listed in serious condition.

Despite this, county and state officials say dealing with Dix has been an ongoing saga since the summer.

“Twenty years of my life I’ve dedicated, and now they’re just trying to destroy the rescue and flush it down the toilet,” Dix said.

Deseret News archives

James Dix, owner of Reptile Rescue Service, holds several Albino Burmese Pythons Friday Feb. 18, 2011.

Dix left the roughly 100 critters at the warehouse on Jan. 22, according to workers.

“He promised to have these animals out of here in two days,” said Kyle Workman, one of the workers. “It’s been two weeks-plus.”

Workman said Dix had only returned once since that time, and several of the workers had tried to feed and care for the reptiles themselves over concerns of their well-being, despite little experience of how to do so.

He characterized the situation as Dix, a subcontractor for the organization, essentially dropping the reptiles in the workers’ laps.

 

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“It more or less came down to, ‘You will watch these animals,’” Workman said. “‘You employ me, you are obligated to help me.’”

Dix said he got permission from his boss to bring the animals to the warehouse and that his ex-girlfriend was told by the boss that he had no problems having the animals stay a few more days.

Dix said he had to suddenly move the animals out of a building in Magna because the owner got tired of dealing with the Salt Lake County Zoning and Ordinance rules. She sold the building, and the new owner wouldn’t let him stay there. He said he moved them to the Midvale location and only planned on staying there for four or five days while they found another building.

Steve Breinholt, Deseret News

A snake is pictured at a warehouse at 641 W. 6960 South, Midvale, on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. In a phone interview from his hospital bed at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray on Wednesday, James Dix, owner of Utah’s Reptile Rescue Service, said he had a heart attack and that is why he hasn’t been able to care for dozens of venomous snakes, poisonous spiders, alligators, turtles and other creatures at he left at the warehouse.

“We were going to move them Friday, and I wound up having a heart attack on the road and had to go to the hospital,” Dix said.

Workman said he ultimately contacted Salt Lake County Animal Services.

“See, one of the lizards has died,” Workman said, pointing to a carcass Tuesday. “We’ve had a few turtles perish.”

Dix said he had friends feeding the critters while he was in the hospital.

Wednesday morning, workers with Salt Lake County Animal Services assessed and removed the creatures from the Midvale location with the help of experts from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Inside the warehouse was an SUV belonging to Dix that was marked with caution signs about venomous snakes and reptiles inside.

Salt Lake County Animal Services spokeswoman Callista Pearson said Tuesday that Dix was already under investigation for suspicion of animal cruelty and abandonment after workers roughly two weeks ago removed and relocated nearly 150 animals from a space in Magna that Dix had been occupying. Pearson said a quarter of the animals appeared to be undernourished.

“It looked to us as if he had not fed or watered them for an extended period of time,” Pearson said.

Dix denies it.

“I didn’t know anything about that, but we are a rescue and some stuff comes in rough, and moving animals in the winter affects them, can put them in shock, hypothermia because they are all temperature related,” he said.

Pearson said the case would ultimately have to be screened by county prosecutors.

Dix, who was awaiting surgery Thursday, said it was not unusual for his service to receive animals that were undernourished, and he suggested that the recent matter in Magna was simply part of an ongoing dispute with the county.

He maintained that the animals he had were generally well-cared for.

Comment on this story“This is 20 years of dedicated service to the state of Utah and all the cities and counties who relied on me,” Dix said. “This has cost me thousands and thousands of dollars dedicated to whenever they call 24/7, 365 days a week, and the last thing we would do is just leave our animals and walk away from it. That’s not what happened.”

Workman said the reptiles left at the warehouse would likely receive better care if turned over to animal services.

“This is not the environment for these reptiles,” Workman said. “It’s not our responsibility as a business owner to take care of rescued animals.”

 

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103

 

Read more Reptile Rescuer Accused of Abandoning Snakes, Spiders at Warehouse [News Blog]