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Nonnative Animals Freeze Out

dead iguanaThe Big Chill Takes The Bite Out Of Nonnative Wildlife

South Florida’s recent unusual cold weather might be helping with the problem of nonnative species.

Pythons and other snakes, reptiles and fish are dying by the thousands as temperatures drop.

Colder Weather Puts Things Into Balance

Vultures circled over the Anhinga Trail inside the Everglades National Park where thousands of dead nonnative fish floated in the marshes.

Among the Burmese pythons found in the park lately about have of them are dead.

Dead iguanas have dropped from trees and into lawns and patios across South Florida.

Southern Tip Of Florida No Exception

In Western Miami-Dade County, three African rock pythons were found dead.

Although South Florida’s warm, moist climate has nurtured a vast range of non-native plants and animals, a January cold snap reminded these intruders that they’re not in Burma or Ecuador anymore.

Temperatures in the 30s have apparently killed Burmese pythons, iguanas and other unwanted species.

“Anecdotally, we might have lost maybe half of the pythons out there to the cold,” said Scott Hardin, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s exotic species coordinator. “Iguanas definitely. From a collection of observations from people, more than 50% fatality on green iguanas. . . . Lots of freshwater fish died; no way to estimate that.”

Nonnative fish that have infested the Everglades are turning up dead in the thousands, including the Mayan Cichlid, walking catfish and Spotfin Spiny Eel, said David Hallac, chief biologist at Everglades National Park.

Experts Agree Cold Weather Stuns Exotic Wildlife Living In Florida

No one knows how many Burmese pythons live in the Everglades, where some were released as unwanted pets and others found refuge after hurricanes destroyed their breeding sites. But there are a lot fewer today than there were a month ago.

Greg Graziani, a police officer who owns a reptile breeding facility, is one of several licensed python hunters who stalk snakes in the Everglades. In four days, he found two dead snakes, two live ones and one on the verge of death.

“Vultures had pecked through 12 inches by 4 inches down the back of this animal’s body,” he said. “I thought it was dead, and we reached down to pick it up, and it was very much alive.”

In cold weather, Graziani said, pythons go into a catatonic state, and if they don’t make it to a safe place to ride out the weather, they freeze to death.

“We’re finding the smaller pythons are handling it better than the large ones,” Graziani said. “The smaller ones can get into different cracks and crevices to maintain the temperatures they need.”

Some information from the LA Times

If you discover any kind of exotic wildlife living in the bushes or canals around your property anywhere in Central Florida. Do not hesitate to give Nuisance Wildlife Trapper a call immediately. The number is:

866-263-WILD (9453)

 

Nonnative Wildlife In Florida

Green Iguana

South American Animal Kingdom Has Moved To Florida

The powers that be in Marco Island Florida hired a wildlife trapper six months ago to catch and kill their nuisance Iguanas. There are a list of complaints. They dedicate in pools.  Eat up shrubs and flowers. They are able to undermine foundations and seawalls. The State of Florida requires the trapper to kill them because they are a nonnative species, and as such, cannot be released back into the wild once captured.

 

 

There Is More Than Meets The Eye With Nonnative Species

Iguanas are just one example of non-native species in Florida becoming a nuisance.

Brown Anole
Brown Anole

Some others are:

  • armadillos
  • foxes
  • hogs
  • rats and mice
  • European rabbit

That is just some of the mammals that have made it into the Florida ecosystem.

The reptiles on the list include:

Don’t know what an Anole is? Ever seen those cute little lizards that stand on the side of a tree and make their throat stick out to warn others and attract a mate?

We won’t even get into the debate here about Africanized Honey Bees in Florida.

 What Does Belong In The Florida Wildlife Kingdom?

Here is a good idea of how diverse Florida wildlife really is without all the nonnative species moving in on our territory.

The point is that practically everything in Florida is nonnative, including most of the people.

Our job here at Nuisance Wildlife Removal is to trap and remove the animals and insects that have become nuisances to people. Now you know why we can’t just move some species to another location and let them go.

 

CALL 866-263-WILD (9453)

Really Large Snake Removal

Delilah is 400 pounds Boa Constrictor snake

More Large Nonnative Snakes Are Showing Up In Private Homes

Florida officials recently removed two unlicensed snakes from a west Florida home. A 17 foot long female, and an 11 foot long male. The female weighed 150 pounds.

Boa Constrictor

Also, an 11 foot long feral Boa Constrictor which has been seen time and time again in the St. Petersburg area over the past few months was finally tracked and caught by a professional trapper .

Burmese Python

The same day, Delilah, an 18 foot, 400 pound Burmese python was removed from a yard in Apopka, Florida. She is 16 years old, and makes a meal of 7 rabbits. Only problem is that she tends to escape her enclosure from time to time, making the neighbors a bit nervous.

Officials determined that the chain link enclosure that contained Delilah was unsuitable, and confiscated her.

Do you have a pet snake that has gotten out of control? Can’t find enough rabbits to feed that monster anymore? Call us at Nuisance Wildlife Removal and we’ll help with the problem.

CALL 866-263-WILD (9453)