Miramar Residents Concerned – Numerous Venomous Snakes [News Blog] Trapping & Removal Bee Ridge

Andre Perez – Reporter Local 10

MIRAMAR, Fla. – Residents are concerned after a number of venomous water moccasins, or cottonmouths, have been spotted in communities in western Broward County in recent weeks.

Miramar resident Eric Misch spotted a snake hiding under a rock in his front yard not long ago. Shortly after he killed it, his neighbor reported finding another one outside her home.

 

HAVE A SNAKE IN YOUR HOME on Bee Ridge Rd.?

CALL 1-866-263-WILD! 

Read more Miramar Residents Concerned – Numerous Venomous Snakes [News Blog] Trapping & Removal Bee Ridge

Snake Trapping and Removal Lakewood Ranch [News Blog] 5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing up in People’s Toilets

by Reegan Von Wildenradt Jan 5, 2018

 

​5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing Up in People's Toilets

YOUTUBE.COM / FACEBOOK.COM
If you’re reading this while seated on a toilet, we advise you to finish up before proceeding. We hate to break it to you, but snakes crawling up toilets is a real-life thing that happens outside of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Read more Snake Trapping and Removal Lakewood Ranch [News Blog] 5 Terrifying Stories of Snakes Showing up in People’s Toilets

Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ [News Blog]

Story Credit: Mirror  By: Luke Kenton

Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ after allowing ‘world’s deadliest snakes’ to bite him HUNDREDS of times

Tim Friede has inflicted himself with more than 200 bites from snakes that could kill within minutes in bid to help develop life-saving vaccines.

A scientist claims he’s ‘immune to venom’ after allowing himself to be bitten by the world’s deadliest snakes hundreds of times.

Tim Friede has inflicted himself with more than 200 bites from snakes that could kill within minutes in a bid to help develop life-saving vaccines.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

Read more Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ [News Blog]

A Field Guide for Living with Wildlife this Spring!

How to Watch out for Animal Safety

These tips will help you live in harmony with nature and prevent injuring a baby animal or causing it to be orphaned.

With regards to chimneys and vents:

Truth be told, an open chimney or dryer/stove vent is considered an “open house” invitation from a wild animal’s viewpoint. Why? Because they make appealing places to have young and are generally cozy environments. Don’t be shocked or too surprised if you should happen to find some guests in your chimney this spring… If you can possibly let them be- just temporarily- that would be one option. However, once the babies have left, then you should have the area decontaminated and the chimney should be closed off or capped.

A word of caution: NEVER attempt to evacuate the chimney by smoking out the animals… it can have deadly consequences. Baby animals may not be able to get out on their own.

Most birds are protected by the Migratory Bird Act and cannot be killed or moved. Unless you are able to exclude birds out early, prior to them laying eggs, you must leave them alone for a few weeks until the young are able to fly on their own.

There is a way to humanely attempt to provoke the animals to leave and they are as follows:

  1. Place a radio in the fireplace and turn up the volume.
  2. Turn on lights.
  3. Carefully place rags soaked in cider vinegar (but not ammonia) in the fireplace.
Wildlife Removal Lakewood Ranch
Chimneys are an easy access point for many animals.

Animals in the Attic:

Before commencing to spring clean out your attic, check around for any animals that might have taken up residence there.

Don’t even try to evict any animals– there could be babies and you never want to separate mama from a baby wild animal. Since wild animals can cause a lot of damage not to mention some serious health risks, you may need professional help to determine the species of the animal and legally trap and relocate the family of guests. This is the safest, best and most humane way of solving this problem of animals in homes.

 

Noises-in-Attic-Lakewood-Ranch
Before you Clean out your Attic- check for uninvited guests!

/h2>

Outdoors:

Windows and Sliding Doors

Sometimes birds can fly right into glass pane windows or sliding glass doors. To avoid this you can place a visual deterrant or obstruction of Mylar tape from the top of the glass outside in front of the window.

Siding

There are special places that animals like to come in to your home from. Check behind appliances, anywhere that pipes enter into the building. Some animals can get in to even a 1/2″ to a 1/4″ hole or crack for example snakes or mice. Cover up those holes with insualtion, paper, cloth– then give it a few days and see if those materials have been pushed out. Afterwards seal up those gaps.

Lawns

In order to protect baby wildlife you should walk around the yard before mowing to take a look. You are looking for things like turtles, and nests of baby rabbits. Turtles are fine to gently relocate. However rabbit nests should be left alone, so that the mom rabbit can be sure to return to the same place when she returns to feed them. They’ll be grown up and ready to live on their own in just 3 weeks. A great tip is to leave a safety zone of grass around the nest until they are gone.

Trees

Keep branches around your house trimmed in order to dissuade wild critters from climbing. Be sure to look carefully at the limbs for birds and squirrels prior to trimming. Make sure that there are no nests there. If by chance a nest is accidentally knocked out here are some guidelines for preserving the animals..

Retrieve the babies and the nest and move them to a secure nearby area.

If the nest is damaged, do your best to mend it or replace it with something of similar size.

It is ok to use a household container as long as it hasn’t been used previously for cleaners.

You could punch holes in the bottom of plastic containers to help for drainage.

Be on the lookout for the mother to come back. Do not worry that if a human scent gets on the babym it will cause the mother to reject it. That is a myth.

Got Nuisance WILDLIFE? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc is  a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the real experts and have the long-time experience to prove it. Don’t trust your home or family to a new kid on the block. Call today to speak with a trusted professional. 

To read part II of our Raccoon FAQ installment series “Are Raccoons Dangerous During the Day?” click here

To read part I of our Raccoon FAQ installment series “How to Get Rid of a Raccoon?” click here

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc

1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103
 

How Can You Tell if a Snake is Poisonous or Not? [Lakewood Ranch, FL]

 

It is a common myth to say poisonous when it comes to snakes. However as explained in the above graphic– snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous. So to answer the question, how to tell if a snake is poisonous or not, we will have to re-state the question. How do you tell if a snake is venomous or not?

A snake that has heat-sensing pits is venomous.  What are heat sensing pits? They are holes in the snakes’ faces that are called pit organs. These organs have a membrane that has heat sensitive receptors that can detect infrared radiation from warm bodies up to one meter away. (Just over 3′) As a result, these snakes can detect prey even in the dark. They are known the venomous snakes known as “PIT VIPERS.”

Triangular heads is another common trait in many venomous snakes. For example, the rattlesnake, copperhead, and water moccasin all have arrowhead-shaped faces. Also, if you are close enough to see—- PIT VIPERS also have pupils that are oblong, like a slit.

Have questions about snakes or other wild animals on your property? Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc. is your expert for snake removal in Manatee and Sarasota County.

Call today to talk with a trusted professional. For more information or a  FREE estimate:

Call 1-866-263-WILD or 941-729-2103.

There is one native snake in Florida that is venomous yet does not fit the above description because it is not a Viper. That is the CORAL snake. It is not a PIT VIPER as are the above, but rather is from a family of snakes called the ELAPIDS. For further info on the CORAL SNAKE please read this article. 

 

WORRIED ABOUT SNAKES? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

 Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc. is fully licensed and insured. We are a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the REAL experts with the LONG-TERM experience that can save you from costly mistakes. Don’t trust your home or budget to a new guy on the block. Call today and speak with a trusted professional.

Learn more about our company here.

Snake had receded into a dark area in the walls of the home. The Go-Pro camera technology was used to secure its location and capture the snake for removal.

 

To see our summary page of the snakes and the images click here.

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103


.

Venomous-Snakes-West-Central-Florida

What is the Most Venomous Snake in the United States? [Parrish, FL]

Have you ever wondered, what is the most venomous snake in the US? Well, the most fatal venomous bites are attributed to the eastern and western diamondback rattlesnake. Copperheads account for more cases of venomous snake bite than any other North American species; however, their venom is the least toxic, so their bite is not often fatal.

Snake Species

In the USA there are about 20 species of snakes that are venomous. Among those are 16 species of rattlesnakes, two species of coral snakes, one cottomouth (water moccasin) and one species of copperhead.  The only states that do NOT have a venomous snake are Alaska and Hawaii.

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) kills the most people in the US, with the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) ranking second. However, some authorities think the western diamondback is responsible for the most deaths.

 

Most Fatal Venomous Snake in USA
Most Fatal Venomous Snake in USA

 

Eastern Diamondback Among the Most Venomous Snakes in the USA Photo: Wiki

WORRIED ABOUT SNAKES? Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

 Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc. is fully licensed and insured. We are a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the REAL experts with the LONG-TERM experience that can save you from costly mistakes. Don’t trust your home or budget to a new guy on the block. Call today and speak with a trusted professional.

 

Venomous-Snakes-West-Central-Florida

Click the above link to open the pdf (portable document format) file, which is the best quality for print.

Have questions about snakes or other wild animals on your property? Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. is your expert for  snake removal in Manatee County. Call today to talk with a professional wildlife technician. For more information and a FREE estimate call 1-866-263-WILD or 941-729-2103.

Learn more about our company here.

Snake had receded into a dark area in the walls of the home. The Go-Pro camera technology was used to secure its location and capture the snake for removal.

Central Florida’s Four Venomous Snake Species [Native]

There are four venomous snakes that flourish in central and southern Florida, namely the eastern diamondback, the eastern coral snake, the dusky pygmy rattlesnake and the Florida cottonmouth, also known as the water moccasin.

 Florida offers ideal weather conditions and habitat for dozens of snake species, but only four of those snake species are classified as venomous. Venomous snakes inject venom when they bite. Although venomous snakes are often described as poisonous, venomous snakes aren’t actually poisonous since poison must be ingested rather than injected. Technically, there’s no such thing as a poisonous snake. Venomous snakes, on the other hand, are dangerous and should be avoided.

Florida residents shouldn’t be overly concerned about non-venomous snakes, but it’s important to note that it can be difficult to distinguish between the previously mentioned venomous snakes and certain non-venomous snake species. It should also be mentioned that north Florida is home to the timber rattlesnake and the copperhead.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake species in the United States. The average length of an eastern diamondback is between five and six feet. This dangerous venomous snake will strike from a classic coiled position and can extend half of its body length to reach a target. Never go near an eastern diamondback to avoid serious injury.

Eastern Coral Snake

The eastern coral snake is distinguished by a red and yellow coloration pattern. The venom of the eastern coral snake is neurotoxic, affecting the nervous system and causing paralysis of the diaphragm.

Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake

The dusky pygmy rattlesnake is a small rattlesnake with an average length of between 15 and 22 inches. The rattle is so small it sounds like a buzzing insect. This venomous snake is gray with colored blotches running along its back. The venom of the dusky pygmy rattlesnake is painful but not lethal. This particular snake accounts for more Florida snakebites than any other venomous snake species.

Florida Cottonmouth

Also known as a water moccasin, the Florida cottonmouth is a venomous water snake. This dangerous venomous snake is characterized by its solid dull black or patterned coloration. The most common way to identify a water moccasin is to watch for the black eye line running from the side of the snake’s eye and down the side of its head. Even baby cottonmouths have this distinctive eye line.

To see our summary page of the snakes and the images click here.

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc
1329 10th Street East Palmetto, Florida 34221
(941) 729-2103


The Four Native Venomous Snakes of West Central Florida – Printable

Venomous-Snakes-West-Central-Florida

Click the above link to open the pdf (portable document format) file, which is the best quality for print.

West Central Florida’s Four Venomous Snake Species [Native]

There are four venomous snakes that flourish in central and southern Florida, namely the eastern diamondback, the eastern coral snake, the dusky pygmy rattlesnake and the Florida cottonmouth, also known as the water moccasin.

 Florida offers ideal weather conditions and habitat for dozens of snake species, but only four of those snake species are classified as venomous. Venomous snakes inject venom when they bite. Although venomous snakes are often described as poisonous, venomous snakes aren’t actually poisonous since poison must be ingested rather than injected. Technically, there’s no such thing as a poisonous snake. Venomous snakes, on the other hand, are dangerous and should be avoided.

Florida residents shouldn’t be overly concerned about non-venomous snakes, but it’s important to note that it can be difficult to distinguish between the previously mentioned venomous snakes and certain non-venomous snake species. It should also be mentioned that north Florida is home to the timber rattlesnake and the copperhead.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake species in the United States. The average length of an eastern diamondback is between five and six feet. This dangerous venomous snake will strike from a classic coiled position and can extend half of its body length to reach a target. Never go near an eastern diamondback to avoid serious injury.

Eastern Coral Snake

The eastern coral snake is distinguished by a red and yellow coloration pattern. The venom of the eastern coral snake is neurotoxic, affecting the nervous system and causing paralysis of the diaphragm.

Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake

The dusky pygmy rattlesnake is a small rattlesnake with an average length of between 15 and 22 inches. The rattle is so small it sounds like a buzzing insect. This venomous snake is gray with colored blotches running along its back. The venom of the dusky pygmy rattlesnake is painful but not lethal. This particular snake accounts for more Florida snakebites than any other venomous snake species.

Florida Cottonmouth

Also known as a water moccasin, the Florida cottonmouth is a venomous water snake. This dangerous venomous snake is characterized by its solid dull black or patterned coloration. The most common way to identify a water moccasin is to watch for the black eye line running from the side of the snake’s eye and down the side of its head. Even baby cottonmouths have this distinctive eye line.

To see our summary page of the snakes and the images click here.

Two New Dog Faced Bats Discovered in Panama & Ecuador

Researchers from the Panama-based Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) first came across the Freeman’s dog-faced bat inside abandoned wooden houses in the town of Gamboa in 2012. Over the course of five nights, the team captured 56 bats using specialized mist nets, took their measurements, then released them. They also recorded the bats’ calls and collected one individual that had died.

WORRIED ABOUT BATS? CALL 1-866-263-WILD

At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in Washington, D.C, the scientists compared their field observations, including DNA, sound recordings and body measurements of the bats, with existing museum collections from across the Americas and Europe, and confirmed that the bat was new to science. They named it Freeman’s dog-faced bat after Patricia Freeman, a bat specialist currently at the University of Nebraska State Museum of Natural History.

“We were very lucky to catch several different individuals of this species in mist nets and to record their calls,” Thomas Sattler, who was one of the team members in Panama at the time of collection, told Smithsonian Insider. “Knowing their species-specific echolocation calls may make it possible to find them again in the future with a bat detector — without catching them—and to find out more about their distribution and habitat preferences.”

In fact, some STRI staff recently spotted pregnant females of the species in Gamboa in August 2017, and some young individuals the following month.

A Waorani dog-faced bat. Photo by Diego Tirira.
The newly described Freeman’s dog-faced bat. Photo by Thomas Sattler.

The Smithsonian team described the second new species — the slightly smaller Waorani dog-faced bat — from individuals collected by other naturalists and researchers from Ecuador’s rainforests. The team did not have any call recordings of the bats, so they confirmed its status by comparing the bats’ physical measurements and DNA with those of other museum specimens collected in Ecuador.

“Identifying two mammal species new to science is extremely exciting,” Ligiane Moras, lead author of the study who did part of this work as a fellow at NMNH, said in a statement.

by Mongabay

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc is fully licensed and insured. We are a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the REAL experts with the long term EXPERIENCE that can save you from costly mistakes. Don’t trust your home or budget to a new guy on the block. Call today to speak with a trusted professional. 1-866-263-WILD! 

 

Crazy Things Raccoons Do [Manatee County]

Raccoon-Dangers-Manatee-County-Bradenton
If you or your pet is bitten by any wild animal, you are urged to seek medical treatment.

 

Crazy Things Raccoons Do [Manatee County]

Unprovoked Raccoon Attacks, Bites, 13-Year Old Girl

June 5, 2017

Here is the scenario. It could have been the most normal father and daughter stroll around the neighborhood, but it became an emergency room visit. The reason was that a raccoon came out of the bushes and bit a little girl on the leg–totally unprovoked!

It was described that in late May evening around 5:45 a father and 13 year old daughter were walking and talking together near the entrance of their neighborhood subdivision around the Cape Coral, FL area. The daughter was said to be less than 5 feet in front of the father when she heard a growling noise from the bushes, followed by a raccoon coming at her that immediately bit on to her leg. When she screamed, the raccoon finally let go.

By the way, if you see raccoons around your property, or think you have them present in your home, please contact a professional! You can click to contact us here 24/7 at Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. or call 1-866-263-WILD or 729-2103. 

It was thought that either the raccoon was rabid or trying to protect her babies. The animal caused the girls shin to bleed and the father immediately took her to the hospital for treatment. According to the Center for Disease Control, when a human is bitten by an animal, at first there may not be any symptoms. But weeks, or even months after a bite, rabies can cause pain, fatigue, headaches, fever, and irritability. These are followed by seizures, hallucinations, and paralysis. Human rabies are almost always fatal.

According to the Center for Disease Control, when a human is bitten by an animal, at first there may not be any symptoms. But weeks, or even months after a bite, rabies can cause pain, fatigue, headaches, fever, and irritability. These are followed by seizures, hallucinations, and paralysis. Human rabies are almost always fatal.

She was given two shots, and advised to return on day 3,7 and 14 for further treatment. Although costs can vary, a course of rabies treatment commonly exceeds $3,000.

Please use caution around any wildlife out there!

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. Stay up to date with local wildlife happenings! Follow us on facebook at  fb.com/wildlife.trapper.

Call Nuisance Wildlife Removal, Inc. today, to humanely solve your wildlife problems, and wildlife proof your home! 1-866-263-WILD or 941- 729-2103. Feel free to ask us any questions. Click here to send a message. 

 

Information credit to: parkland talk dot com.