Bradenton Raccoon Removal [News Blog] Reports of Zombie like Raccoons puzzle Police in Ohio

Youngstown, OH (WKBN)

Photo Credit: Robert Coggeshall

 

YOUNGSTOWN, OH (WKBN) – Youngstown police were busy this weekend fighting crime — and raccoons. Several scared homeowners called, saying the animals were in their yards, acting strangely. Police said it didn’t seem like rabies was the cause.

In the past couple of weeks, Youngstown police have responded to over a dozen of these raccoon calls — all of them with reports of the same strange, zombie-like behavior. The majority of the calls happened in the daytime, too, even though raccoons are nocturnal. Read more Bradenton Raccoon Removal [News Blog] Reports of Zombie like Raccoons puzzle Police in Ohio

Coyotes Take Over Swanky New York Neighborhood [News Blog]

Jump to our post “How to Keep Your Pets Safe from Coyotes”

 

Read more Coyotes Take Over Swanky New York Neighborhood [News Blog]

Longboat Key Raccoon Removal and Trapping – [Raccoon News]

Dogs Bitten by Rabid Raccoon–

By Debbie Gilbert – White County News

In what has become a familiar scenario, a rabid raccoon attacked a dog on Monday, March 19, making it the third confirmed case of rabies in White County this year.

Then on Thursday, March 22, another dog was bitten by a rabid raccoon in the same area of the county, raising the 2018 total of rabies cases to four.

Sean Sullivan, the county’s environmental health manager, said the March 19 incident happened on Frank Black Road, which is northeast of Asbestos Road. The attack involved the family’s pet beagle.

WORRIED ABOUT RACCOONS?

Call 1-866-263 WILD!

Or easily contact us by clicking here. 

Nuisance Wildlife Removal Inc is fully licensed and insured. We are a locally and family-owned business that has been operating in Manatee and Sarasota county for 20 years. We are the REAL experts with the LONG-TERM experience that can save you from costly mistakes. Don’t trust your home or budget to a new guy on the block. For raccoon trapping and removal in Longboat Key call today and speak with a trusted professional.

Raccoon Removal and Trapping Longboat Key
Raccoon under some brush peering outward.

Read more Longboat Key Raccoon Removal and Trapping – [Raccoon News]

Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ [News Blog]

Story Credit: Mirror  By: Luke Kenton

Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ after allowing ‘world’s deadliest snakes’ to bite him HUNDREDS of times

Tim Friede has inflicted himself with more than 200 bites from snakes that could kill within minutes in bid to help develop life-saving vaccines.

A scientist claims he’s ‘immune to venom’ after allowing himself to be bitten by the world’s deadliest snakes hundreds of times.

Tim Friede has inflicted himself with more than 200 bites from snakes that could kill within minutes in a bid to help develop life-saving vaccines.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

He claims he is the only person in the world who could now survive back-to-back snake bites.

The 39-year-old has even taken on a sub-Saharan Black Mamba, which is widely considered the ‘world’s deadliest snake’, with a bite that could result in a very painful death within 15 minutes.

Read more Scientist ‘becomes immune to snake venom’ [News Blog]

Dog Stops Rabid Raccoon from Chasing Kids [News blog]

Raccoon Staring Outdoor on a Wooden Fence (Getty Images/Stock photo)

By: Jason Ruiter  Orlando Sentinel

Elvin Rodriguez’s 9- and 10-year-old sons were playing basketball at dusk on the driveway at their Tavares home when a nocturnal creature slipped through the fence.

After the raccoon started chasing the boys, the family’s dog, a 6-year-old boxer named Macho, came to their defense.

“I think he [Macho] knew, I think he heard the kids yelling and carrying on and he just jumped right in,” Rodriguez, 34, a Lake County Jail correctional officer, said Wednesday. Macho fought with the raccoon before Rodriguez, who grabbed his personal handgun, was “able to call him off” from the battle that left the dog with scratches around his eyes and ears. “Then it stopped for a minute, and hissed, and I was able to shoot it.”

The raccoon tested positive for rabies after the March 13 encounter, marking the fourth time in seven months a rabid animal has threatened Lake County residents.

“It didn’t sink in until afterwards; I was just trying to make sure the kids were OK,” Rodriguez said. “It [rabies] can be very serious.”

WORRIED ABOUT RACCOONS? 

1-866-263-WILD!

 In January, a 6-year-old boy died after exposure to a rabid bat south of Umatilla. Two weeks after he reported the “scratch” to his parents, he told them he couldn’t feel his fingers. Then his arms began to twitch and flail wildly before a severe headache set in that sent Ryker Roque, a rambunctious boy, into a coma. He died Jan. 14 at the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children.

In September, a 74-year-old Clermont man was wearing flip-flops and shorts, picking up fallen branches outside his home near Lake Minneola, when a rabid fox lunged at him. He beat it off with his iPhone, dazing it, before fatally shooting it with a .22-caliber pellet rifle. And last month, another rabid raccoon was reported to be in Fruitland Park, according to the Florida Department of Health in Lake County.

“Rabies is a potentially fatal disease. It is important not to handle wild animals, to be aware of unusual acting animals and to keep pets vaccinated against rabies,” department administrator Aaron Kissler said.

Macho is now quarantined in the kennel on Rodriguez’s property until April 27. Read more Dog Stops Rabid Raccoon from Chasing Kids [News blog]

April 15th Marks the Start of Florida’s Bat Maternity Season

It’s time to evict your uninvited bat guests! Bat maternity season begins April 15th and runs through August 15th. Exclusions of bat colonies must be completed before maternity season arrives. What happens is, bats will be giving birth to their young. From that time forward, until the young bats can fly on their own and feed themselves. It is not legal to exlude bats out of buildings during maternity season This is in order to prevent any young bats that can not yet fly from– getting stuck and trapped inside structures and dying.

The state of Florida claims 13 resident species, including the threatened species: Florida bonneted bat. There are some bats that roost in not natural structures such as inside of homes or buildings. It is not legal to harm or kill bats in Florida, there are guidelines that have been developed allowing for bats to be excluded as long as it is not during maternity season.

Bats are very important to our ecosystem. The native bats help keep insects in check. They keep mosquitoes and other bugs at bay for residents who want to enjoy the outdoors. The value of bats to the agricultural industry is estimated in the billions of dollars.

 

Read more April 15th Marks the Start of Florida’s Bat Maternity Season

Dangers and Repercussions of DIY Wildlife Control Solutions

DIY Nightmares
A vent entry point that a client attempted to seal.

Unfortunately, after the momma raccoon left one day, this homeowner thought he would solve the issue of re-entry. What you are seeing here is a roof vent that the mama raccoon gained entry through originally. So, you may ask…. what’s the problem? Was there any harm done? Well, the little baby raccoons that were still inside the home think so! If you are a homeowner, please do not get involved or in the way of what a professional trapper is doing!

Read more Dangers and Repercussions of DIY Wildlife Control Solutions